Category Archives: ODCamp3

Open data platform requirements

Open data platform requirements, Bristol, capture

What should an open data platform look like? This was the question addressed by a session triggered by Martin Howitt of ODI Devon in relation to Bristol’s plans to develop its platform.

“[There is] an open data platform that was brought in by the council [to release] data sets, but it wants to move on to next level: e.g. citizen sensing projects, citizen data sets, information from third sector and even private sector partners,” he said.

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Better Highways with Open Data

Highways open data issues capture

Highways may look like the perfect area for open data initiatives. There is lots of data about highways assets; there is public demand for new services, such as websites or apps through which they can report potholes; and councils have incentives to get involved.

As Teresa Jolly, the leader of a session on highways pointed out, councils need to start making better use of their data, because people are saying:

We have all these new demands on us, and we have no money. How can we start talking to our communities about meeting their real needs without breaking the bank.

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Evaluating open data: how do you prove the value?

Open Data - proof of value

WARNING – liveblogging. Prone to error, inaccuracy and howling affronts to grammar and syntax. Posts will be improved over the next 48 hours

Google doc of this session

How do we evaluate the impact of open data – and prove its worth? A debate at Open Data Camp 3 dived deep into the issues – and came up with a few solutions.

Firstly, getting feedback on data sets seems to a real problem. It’s really hard to get feedback on data other than “that address is wrong”.

Sian from the Food Standards Agency would love to know what people are doing – and building – with their data. And it’s not just about proving commercial value, it’s also about persuading other departments and building the case for open data. Can we build up an armoury of cases to persuade people?

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Open Data from space

ODCamp Day One_5

WARNING – liveblogging. Prone to error, inaccuracy and howling affronts to grammar and syntax. Posts will be improved over the next 48 hours

There’s increasing amounts of data available from remote sensing – satellite, aerial – and more existing data sets are being opened up. Some of it is about land covers, some about surface elevations and some about pollution modelling.

But the data is challenging. There’s a lot of it, and it often requires several steps to get to the information you actually want. You have to identify the area you want – and draw out the data you want.

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Women in Open Data

Women in Open Data capture

Why have a session on women in open data? It was the first question to be addressed at the post-lunch session on that topic, which was held under Chatham House Rules (meaning that the content of what was said could be reported, but not who said it).

The session organiser argued that a session was needed because: “As women, even as feminists, were are conditioned to please men, so I thought it was important to have this space. Because with the best will in the world other sessions can be dominated by men, and there is a lot of mansplaining and stuff like that.”

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Lessons learned from open data use

Lessons learned from open data livecaptured

Google Docs notes from this session

Councils have really good data sets: but they can find it hard to find out what local communities would like to do with it. The ‘Lessons Learned’ session packed a break-out room with Open Data Camp participants keen to share their issues, ideas, and solutions to the problem.

The session was opened by Lee Dodds of Bath Hacked, who is working with council and local community to use data “for benefit of those who live in the area and those who visit us.”

 

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How do we persuade businesses to release open data?

WARNING – liveblogging. Prone to error, inaccuracy and howling affronts to grammar and syntax. Posts will be improved over the next 48 hours

Opening up corporate data

Google Docs notes for this session

The Food Standards Agency is working hard to open up its data. But how do they encourage others in the food chain to open up business data? There’s some clear value in doing that.

Is that value also there in other sectors? And how do we persuade business to open up their data?

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How to map everything – and how to share it

WARNING – liveblogging. Prone to error, inaccuracy and howling affronts to grammar and syntax. Posts will be improved over the next 48 hours

Map Everything_1

Google Docs notes for this session

(Alistair Rae introduced the ideas for this session in a blog post: How to map everything (but you definitely shouldn’t)

The age of open data has created an George Mallory approach to geo data: why did you create it? Because it’s there. Alistair has created loads of maps just because he could. But “why?” needs to be asked more.

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Datopolis: the board game for open data

Datopolis - captured

Google Docs notes for this session

Datopolis is a board game, created by Jeni Tennison and Ellen Broad from the Open Data Institute. At the outset of the session, Ellen explained that the game has been in development for around 12 months, and is still being prototyped.

The aim, naturally, is to explain the principles of open data and how they can be put to work. Jeni took a keen – if slightly apprehensive – set of players through the basics. The key pieces are hexagonal data tiles, she said, which represent data sets of different types. Clouds, for example, are weather data. Trains are transport. The tiles have two sides: a closed side and an open side.

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Open Data Camp 3 is underway: session pitching

ODCamp 3 Pre Work_3 small

And we’re off. Open Data Camp 3 (Bristol!) is underway. Probably about a third of the attendees are Open Data Camp veterans.

It’s pitching time. Let’s hunt for some themes:

  • Women and Open Data – not a women only session, men are welcome to listen.
  • Dataopolis – the open data boardgame
  • Hardware hacking – getting data from devices

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